©2018 by Mark Tigchelaar. Proudly created with Wix.com

 Coffee isn't complicated.  Learn how to simplify coffee, make a better and easier cup at home or simplify your cafe operations.

Search

3 Easy Ways to Support a Foster Family

Updated: Sep 16, 2019

If you know a family that has foster children here's 3 easy ways to help.


1) Bring Dinner on Social Worker Visit Days


When you are a foster parent, sometimes it feels like your house isn’t your own. Social workers visit weekly, monthly, quarterly (depending on the case).


Knives, cleaning supplies, medicines all need to be locked up, first aid kits accessible, fire extinguisher up to date and accessible, evacuation plan, emergency contact list posted, etc. The list goes on.


Most foster parents will want the house to be clean and picked up – just to avoid any potential issues with social workers. As you can imagine, this can make for a busy day. Bringing dinner or helping clean the day of the visit is so helpful!


2) Offer to Babysit


This is helpful for any parents but nothing is better than having a trusted babysitter offer to give a foster parent a night off. The first time my wife Katie and I went out to dinner after our first foster placement we just started laughing when we sat down for dinner because it just felt so good. It was a vacation.


3) Do Not Compare


One of the hardest things for foster/adoptive parents is when someone tries to compare their experiences or challenges with something they’ve experienced with their own biological children.

I get it, it’s human nature, and the intent behind it is not likely to cause pain.


But it does. It might very well be true that your child has hit you before, but I promise it doesn’t feel the same for the foster parent.


Remember, these children very likely had severe early trauma (even potentially in the womb!), and this can have effects on behavior, emotional competence, coping skills, development, and more.


Don’t compare your biological children to an adoptive/foster child’s negative behaviors. And definitely don’t say “oh that’s normal for a 4-year-old!”. It’s better just to listen.




109 views
 
 
 

About

Mark Tigchelaar is not an author or a speaker, and still doesn't know what the hell he wants to do with his life.  But that's okay. 

What he does know is that he likes to do different things, invest in different industries, invest in people, and never stay put.  He likes questions, 3rd way thinking, Rob Bell, post conventional morality, refugees, and foster kiddos. 

Mark's biggest focus is Solid Coffee Roasters.

Mark's strengths are Maximizer, Futuristic, Command, Relator, Activator, and he's a DC (Demand,Cautious) on the DISC Profile.  

 

Projects

Portfolio of Work

Leather

Made me some leather

Etsy Shop

Calvin College

Alumni Board

2018 - 3 Year Term

full-color-positive-vertical.png

12147 South St Artesia CA 90701